Blog

Innocence and Justice Clinic director shares thoughts on ‘Making a Murderer’ documentary

Professor Mark Rabil, the director of Wake Forest Law’s Innocence Clinic, said he started teaching the Steven Avery murder case years before the “Making a Murderer” documentary came out. He shares his thoughts on what the popular series shows with WXII’s Briana Conner. Watch the video.

Darryl Hunt Writes Column on Racial Justice Act

Here is a recent column by Darryl Hunt on the Racial Justice Act, which legislators are threatening to repeal:  http://www.journalnow.com/opinion/columnists/article_7a61ba26-6ffe-11e2-b7dc-0019bb30f31a.html

Innocence Network and Innocence Project Urge Georgia Board to Reconsider Decision and DA to lift execution warrant

(ATLANTA, GA;  September 20, 2011) Today the Innocence Network and the Innocence Project submitted a letter to the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles urging the board to reconsider its decision denying clemency to Troy Davis who is scheduled to be executed tomorrow.  Continue reading »

Prosecutors want Innocence Commission to exclude prisoners who pleaded guilty

Prosecutors across the state have mounted an effort to block defendants who plead guilty from appealing to the N.C. Innocence Inquiry Commission, a state agency that examines claims that a prisoner may have been wrongly convicted. “Continue reading”  

Woman Who Spent 12 Years Wrongfully Incarcerated to Speak Thursday at Wake Forest

Exoneree Beverly Monroe will discuss the 11 years she spent wrongfully incarcerated at 12 p.m. Thursday in the Worrell Professional Center room 1302 at Wake Forest University.

Monroe was wrongfully charged in the 1992 murder of a 60-year-old research scientist found dead with a bullet in his head in his Virginia home. Continue Reading this story.

Professor Carol Turowski to participate in ‘Government Criminal Justice and Public Safety Day’ on Dec. 8

Wake Forest University School of Law Professor Carol Turowski has been invited by Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines to participate in the “Leadership Winston-Salem 2010 Government Criminal Justice and Public Safety Day” on Dec. 8.   Continue reading this story

Poole case to be studied

Law-school students working with Wake Forest University’s Innocence and Justice Clinic are investigating the innocence claim of a former Winston-Salem man who has been convicted twice of killing his lover’s husband in South Carolina. Continue reading this story.

Police: Abbitt case rushed

Winston-Salem police wanted to test additional evidence before Joseph Abbitt was freed from prison on rape charges last year, but the suggestion was not heeded, Police Chief Scott Cunningham said yesterday.  Continue reading this story.

Race Factor in Death Sentences (Blog)

The title of this post is the headline of this notable new commentary atThe Huffington Post by Carol Turowski, who serves as Co-Director of the Innocence and Justice Clinic at Wake Forest University School of Law.  Here are snippets from the piece that, I suspect, will get some pro-death-penalty readers going:

The release last week of a study conducted by two law professors at Michigan State University College of Law has reignited the debate over the question of what role race plays in North Carolina when defendants are facing a death sentence. After examining 5,800 cases in North Carolina that were eligible for the death penalty from 1990 through 2009, the study concluded that a defendant in North Carolina is 2.6 times more likely to be sentenced to death if at least one of the victims is white. Moreover, the study found that more than 40 percent of defendants on North Carolina’s death row were sentenced to death by a jury that was either all-white or included only one person of color. It was also determined by researchers that, during the jury selection process, prosecutors statewide struck qualified blacks from the potential jury pool at more than twice the rate of whites….Continue reading this story.

Race Factor in Death Sentence

The release last week of a study conducted by two law professors at Michigan State University College of Law has reignited the debate over the question of what role race plays in North Carolina when defendants are facing a death sentence. After examining 5,800 cases in North Carolina that were eligible for the death penalty from 1990 through 2009, the study concluded that a defendant in North Carolina is 2.6 times more likely to be sentenced to death if at least one of the victims is white.  Continue reading this story.